“The Pathology of Privilege” (Tim Wise)

Since this is a highly important discussion to have in our current context, I thought I would share this with as many people as possible.

The video I will post is accessible on Youtube (all 6 parts). I will also post two links to Tim Wise on Obama and race.

Essentially, this is a talk about racism, white privilege and social inequalities. If it doesn’t change your perspective, it will certainly teach you something! Tim Wise is awesome.

Enjoy!

 

“Between Barack and a Hard Place”

 

A discussion about Obama and race…

Advertisements

“Tolerance”: A Word I Don’t Tolerate

It never fails. Every time I converse with someone about inequality in the world, they always use the word “tolerance” to express how we should go about relating to one another.

Now, I don’t disagree that we must learn about each other and learn to live amongst each other in peace and harmony; this is not what I’m saying. I take issue with the word itself.

Who ever wants to be “tolerated“?

The use of this word supposes that a bigger, more powerful, dominant group, makes an effort to tolerate a minority group or someone of “lesser” value, so to speak. The word itself, to me, embodies the very definition of inequality. When I hear the word “tolerance”, I hear: “Oh, look at us! How good we are to put up with you when we really don’t have to. We’re doing you a favour by making a conscious choice not to run you to the ground. You’re so lucky to have us “tolerate” you.”

O.K., I might push the envelope a little, but I think you get the point.

Sure! Some might argue that this is a question of semantics, and that it really is not a big deal, but it makes me cringe.

I tolerate you.” Can you hear the condescension in that?

Let’s not teach “tolerance”. Let’s teach acceptance.

There is a BIG difference between the two.

“I accept you.” – Now THAT is nice, isn’t it?

🙂

The Beauty of my Community

I am, as a white woman, the minority in my community and I love it.

I am surrounded by so many people from so many different places, and I think it’s simply the most beautiful thing in the world. I feel like I am a part of something special when I walk along the streets of my community. Markets, stores, shops and restaurants display an array of cultural and ethnic diversity.

In my apartment building, we have an African family (not sure which country), an Algerian family, two Mexican families, an Indian family, a Haitian family and a Vietnamese couple. I am the only white person in the building.

My elderly Vietnamese neighbours of almost 5 years speak neither English or French, but we smile at each other, wish each other a good day and gesture our way through our small “conversations”. They give us small gifts on special occasions, and the woman sometimes cooks food for us. When their grandchildren come over, they send us little messages expressing their love and gratitude, and we take the opportunity to do the same.

Multi-racial families like mine are far from being the exception here. 95% of the student body in both schools in which I work are from various countries. In addition, not only does my son have friends from different backgrounds, he also speaks fluent Spanish thanks to his wonderful caregiver!

We are so lucky! What a glorious thing to live amongst each other in harmony.

Clearly, there is not one place in the world where inequality does not exist, and this is not to say that my community is perfect. Social issues exist here just as they do everywhere else. I am grateful, however, that my son is exposed to such diversity as it will allow him to understand (perhaps with a little help from his mama) that despite our differences, we are all the same: human beings.